Light-Duty Jobs

person doing inspections

If you were injured at work, your employer may have another job or an adapted form of your previous job that takes your medical restrictions into account. This is sometimes referred to as a "light-duty" job.

When it comes to light-duty work, it's important to know your legal rights. Taking a light-duty job may affect how much workers' compensation you receive or even stop your benefits altogether.

Our attorneys and legal staff have helped over 8,000 injured workers navigate the Pennsylvania workers' compensation system and get the money they deserve. When you call 1-866-943-3427 or fill out the form at the top right of this page, you can find out if you have a case for free.

Examples of Light-Duty Work

Light-duty work is a modified version of your old job or a completely different job. In either case, it takes your physical limitations into consideration. These types of jobs may consist of you working shorter hours, doing less physical labor, working more slowly, etc.

Just a few examples of light-duty work include:

  • Taking inventories
  • Performing office tasks
  • Working a desk job
  • Supervising and reporting on job sites
  • Monitoring surveillance cameras
  • Performing machinery/equipment maintenance

Light-Duty Jobs and Your Benefits

Light-duty work can affect your workers' compensation benefits. There are a few different scenarios that impact the amount and type of benefits you receive.

If you take on light-duty work and:

  • You make the same amount of money or more money than what you made before your injury, your payments for lost wages will stop
  • You make less money than before your injury, you will receive lost wage payments in the form of partial disability benefits

Remember:

  • You do not have to accept any light-duty job that would exceed the medical restrictions set by your doctor.
  • If you choose not to take a light-duty job that accommodates your medical restrictions, your employer can ask a workers' compensation judge to modify or terminate your benefits.
  • If your employer does not have a light-duty job available, you can continue to receive your Pennsylvania workers' compensation benefits.
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