Motorcycle Helmet Laws - By State

 
All Riders
 
Age Requirement
 
No Helmet Law

Alabama Motorcycle Helmet Law

Alabama law requires anyone who operates or rides on a motorcycle to wear protective headgear specifically designed for motorcycle riders and passengers. The law requires the helmet to have a hard exterior shell of nonshatterable material that resists impact and penetration. The helmet must also have a firmly secured shock absorbent cradle for the head that is designed to support the helmet and maintain separation between the head and outer shell. The padding of the helmet must be impact-resistant, absorbent, and of substantial thickness in all areas where the head is in close proximity with or may contact the outer shell. The helmet must be made of durable materials that will not undergo appreciable alteration as the helmet ages. Materials known to cause skin irritation or disease are not to be used.

Additionally, the helmet must have a permanently attached adjustable chin strap that holds it securely in place. The law requires all drivers and passengers to have the chin strap secured while the bike is in motion. The helmet need not have a visor, but, if it does, the visor must be flexible or of the snap-on type, and it cannot be more than one-quarter inch above the surface or exterior shell. The only exception to Alabama’s helmet law is for those who ride in a sidecar with an enclosed cab.

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Alaska Motorcycle Helmet Law

Persons 18 years of age or older "may not" be required to wear a helmet when operating a motorcycle in Alaska as long as that person is licensed to operate a motorcycle.

However, motorcycle operators are required to wear eye protection unless the motorcycle is equipped with a windscreen or windshield.

The law was established and is regulated by Alaska's Public Safety Commissioner. Because these standards and specifications are subject to change, it's best to check with the Commissioner before riding as a driver or passenger on a motorcycle in Alaska.

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Arizona Motorcycle Helmet Law

In Arizona, only those motorcycle operators and riders under 18 must wear a helmet.

Additionally, all riders and operators, regardless of age, must wear protective glasses, goggles, or a transparent face shield, unless the bike is equipped with a protective windshield.

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Arkansas Motorcycle Helmet Law

Arkansas law requires motorcycle operators and passengers under 21 to wear a helmet. The helmet requirement does not apply to three-wheel motorcycles equipped with a cab and a windshield which do not exceed twenty horsepower (20 hp) when such motorcycles are used by municipal police departments.

All operators and riders, however, regardless of age, must wear protective glasses, goggles or transparent face shields.

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California Motorcycle Helmet Law

In California, anyone who drives or rides on a motorcycle must wear a safety helmet that meets U.S. Department of Transportation and state safety standards. It must be fastened with the helmet straps and fit securely without excessive lateral or vertical movement.

The exception to this rule is when a person is operating or riding as a passenger in a fully-enclosed three-wheeled motor vehicle that is seven feet long or more and four feet wide or more, and has an unladen weight of 900 pounds or more.

Because these regulations can change, it's best to check with the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles or related department before riding a motorcycle on California roadways.

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Colorado Motorcycle Helmet Law

Colorado does not require adult motorcycle drivers or passengers to wear helmets. All operators and passengers under 18 years of age must wear helmets that meet or exceed the standards established by the United States Department of Transportation (DOT) for motorcycle helmets; the helmets must be designed to reduce injury from head impact, as well as consist of lining, padding, and a chin strap. The chip strap must be worn any time the motorcycle is in motion.

Adult operators and riders are required to wear goggles or eyeglasses with lenses made of safety glass or plastic. These eye protection devices are not required if the operator/passenger is wearing a helmet with eye protection made of safety glass or plastic.

The Colorado Department of Revenue is responsible for adopting standards and specifications for the design of the goggles and eyeglasses.

Because these standards and specifications are subject to change, it's advisable to check with the Department before taking to Colorado roadways on a motorcycle.

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Connecticut Motorcycle Helmet Law

In Connecticut, no one under 18 is permitted to operate or ride on a motorcycle without wearing a helmet.

There is a $90 fine for being cited without a helmet.

The Commissioner of Motor Vehicles is responsible for adopting helmet regulations.

Because these regulations can change, motorcycle riders and passengers should check with the Commissioner before riding motorcycles on Connecticut roadways.

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Delaware Motorcycle Helmet Law

Every person up to the age of 19 must wear a safety helmet and eye protection approved by the secretary.

Any rider over the age of 19 must have a helmet and eye protection in their possession when riding.

Because regulations are subject to change, it's best to check with the Secretary of Safety before riding on a motorcycle in Delaware.

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Washington, D.C. Motorcycle Helmet Law

D.C. law requires all motorcycle operators and passengers to wear helmets of a type approved by the Director of the Department of Motor Vehicles. At a minimum, the helmet must meet The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Specifications for Protective Headgear for Vehicle Users, Standard Z90-.1-1966.

D.C. law also requires motorcycle helmets to have permanent, weather-proof reflectors on each side that cover an area of at least four inches. Helmets must also be equipped with either a neck or chin strap. The law further requires that helmets permit unobstructed peripheral vision to 120 degrees on each side. Helmets must also permit unobstructed hearing.

In addition to the helmet law, all motorcycle operators must wear goggles or a face shield, unless the bike is equipped with a windscreen, or unless the operator wears eyeglasses with safety glass lenses.

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Florida Motorcycle Helmet Law

Florida's helmet law is somewhat complex. Generally, it requires all motorcycle operators and riders to wear helmets. The helmet law, however, does not apply to operators or riders over 21, so long as the person is covered by an insurance policy providing for at least $10,000 in medical benefits for injuries incurred as a result of a crash while operating or riding on a motorcycle.

The helmet law also does not apply to any person 16 or older who operates or rides on a motorcycle powered by a motor with a displacement of 50 cubic centimeters or less or is rated not in excess of 2 brake horsepower and which is not capable of propelling the motorcycle at a speed greater than 30 miles per hour on level ground.

All motorcycle drivers and riders, regardless of age, are required to wear eye protection. Anyone who rides in an enclosed side car is not subject to Florida's helmet or eye protection laws.

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Georgia Motorcycle Helmet Law

Under Georgia law, all motorcycle operators and riders must wear a helmet. In addition, eye protection is required if the motorcycle is not equipped with a windshield.

The Commissioner of Motor Vehicle Safety establishes the helmet and eye protection standards. Because these standards can change, you should check with the Commissioner before riding a motorcycle in Georgia.

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Hawaii Motorcycle Helmet Law

In Hawaii, no one under age 18 can operate or ride as a passenger on a motorcycle UNLESS that person wears a safety helmet securely fastened with a chin strap. Riders are not required to wear a helmet over 18 years of age, but must wear safety glasses or goggles or face shield in cases where the motorcycle is not equipped with a windshield.

To be sure you're in compliance with Hawaii law, check with the Director before taking to the open road.

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Idaho Motorcycle Helmet Law

Anyone under 18 who drives or rides on a motorcycle in Idaho must wear a helmet of a type and quality equal to or better than the standards established for helmets by the Director of Motor Vehicles. The helmet requirement does not apply when motorcycles are operated or ridden on private property, or when used as an implement of husbandry.

To be certain that your helmet meets these standards, it's best to check with the Director before riding on a motorcycle in Idaho.

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Illinois Motorcycle Helmet Law

Illinois law does not require motorcycle operators or passengers to wear helmets.

The law does, however, require drivers and riders to protect their eyes with glasses, goggles, or a transparent shield. Under Illinois law, "glasses" means ordinary eye pieces worn in front of the eye, such as spectacles or sunglasses made of shatter-resistant material. "Goggles" means a device that protects the eyes without obstructing peripheral vision. The goggles must provide protection from the front and sides, and may or may not form a complete seal with the face.

A "transparent shield" includes a windshield attached to the front of the bike, provided that it extends above the eyes when the driver is seated in a normal, upright riding position. A "transparent shield" also includes a face shield that covers the wearer's eyes and face at least to the point approximately to the tip of the nose. All transparent shields must be shatter-resistant.

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Indiana Motorcycle Helmet Law

In Indiana, the law requires only those motorcycle drivers and riders under 18 to wear a helmet and protective glasses, goggles, or transparent face shields.

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Iowa Motorcycle Helmet Law

Iowa has no helmet law.

The Iowa legislature repealed its mandatory helmet law in 1976.

As of 2013, there is proposed legislation to reinstate a mandatory helmet law in Iowa.

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Iowa Motorcycle Helmet Law

Iowa has no helmet law.

The Iowa legislature repealed its mandatory helmet law in 1976.

As of 2013, there is proposed legislation to reinstate a mandatory helmet law in Iowa.

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Kentucky Motorcycle Helmet Law

Kentucky law requires all persons under 21 who operate or ride on a motorcycle or who ride in an attached sidecar to wear a helmet.

Helmets are also required to be worn by those drivers who have a motorcycle instruction permit and those who have held their motorcycle operator’s license for less than one year. Those driving under a permit are not permitted to carry passengers.

All motorcycle operators, regardless of age, must wear eye protection that has been approved by the Secretary of Transportation’s cabinet.

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Louisiana Motorcycle Helmet Law

In Louisiana, anyone who operates or rides on a motorcycle must wear a helmet that is secured with a chin strap at all times when the bike is in motion. Police authorities of a village, town, city, or parish may issue a permit exempting members of organizations sponsoring, conducting, or participating in parades or other public exhibitions from the helmet requirement, while such members are actually participating in a parade or other public exhibition. The helmet requirement does not apply to a person operating or riding in an auto-cycle if the vehicle is equipped with a roof which meets or exceeds standards for a safety helmet

In addition to chin straps, all helmets must consist of lining, padding, and a visor, and any other specifications that the Commissioner of the Department of Motor Vehicles may require.

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Maine Motorcycle Helmet Law

Maine law requires all motorcycle and sidecar passengers under 18 to wear a helmet. Motorcycle operators licensed within one year of completing their driver's test and those operating under learner's permits must also wear helmets.

When an operator is required to wear a helmet, Maine law also requires his or her passenger to wear a helmet.

Protective headgear must meet the minimum specifications set forth by the American National Standards Institute or the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard.

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Maryland Motorcycle Helmet Law

In Maryland, all motorcycle drivers and passengers must wear a helmet. Additionally, all motorcycle operators must wear eye protection, unless the bike is equipped with a windscreen.

Helmets and eye protection must meet the standards established by Maryland's Administrator of Transportation, who approves safety gear and adopts/enforces standards and specifications for approval of safety gear. The Administrator publishes a list of all protective gear that is approved by name and type.

Because such standards are subject to change, it is advisable to check with the Administrator before driving or riding on a motorcycle in Maryland.

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Massachusetts Motorcycle Helmet Law

Massachusetts law requires all motorcycle drivers and riders to wear helmets that conform to the minimum standards prescribed by the Registrar of Motor Vehicles.

The mandatory helmet law also applies to anyone riding in a sidecar.

Motorcycle operators must also wear eyeglasses, goggles, or a protective face shield, if the bike is not equipped with a windshield or screen.

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Michigan Motorcycle Helmet Law

In Michigan, riders must wear helmets until they are age 21. Riders over 21 do not need to wear a helmet if: A.) The person has had a motorcycle endorsement on his or her operator's license for at least 2 years or the person passes a motorcycle safety course; B.) The person operating the motorcycle or the rider has in effect security for the first-party medical benefits payable in the event that he or she is involved in an accident (for a motorcycle operator without a rider, $20,000 or more; for a motorcycle operator with a rider, $20,000 per person per occurrence or more). However, if the rider has security of $20,000 or more, then the operator is only required to have security in the amount of $20,000 or more.

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Minnesota Motorcycle Helmet Law

Under Minnesota law, all motorcycle operators and riders under 18 must wear a helmet. In addition, all operators driving a motorcycle under a learner's permit, regardless of age, must wear a helmet.

Those driving under a learner's permit are not allowed to carry passengers, nor can they drive on interstates at night.

Minnesota law also requires all motorcycle operators, regardless of age, to wear eye protection. All helmets and eye-protection devices must comply with the standards established by Minnesota's Commissioner of Public Safety.

The only exceptions to Minnesota's helmet and eye protection laws are for those participating in an officially-authorized parade and for those riding within an enclosed cab.

Because helmet and eye protection standards are subject to change, it is advisable to check with the Public Safety Commissioner before taking a motorcycle out on Minnesota roadways.

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Mississippi Motorcycle Helmet Law

Mississippi law requires all motorcycle operators and riders to wear helmets of the type and design inspected and approved by the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators.

Learn more about the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators and its requirements.

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Missouri Motorcycle Helmet Law

Every person operating or riding as a passenger on any motorcycle or motortricycle on any highway in Missouri must wear protective headgear at all times while the vehicle is in motion. The protective headgear must meet reasonable standards and specifications as established by the Director of Motor Vehicles.

Because these standards and specifications are subject to change, it's best to check with the Director before riding on a motorcycle in Missouri.

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Montana Motorcycle Helmet Law

In Montana, motorcycle operators and passengers under 18 must wear a helmet that meets the standards of the state's Department of Justice.

Also, any passengers under 18 are required to wear a helmet regardless of the driver's age or experience.

If you're under 18, check with the Department to make certain that your helmet complies with Department standards.

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Nebraska Motorcycle Helmet Law

Nebraska requires all motorcycle drivers and passengers to wear a helmet with a chin strap secured at all times when the bike is in motion.

In addition to a chin strap, Nebraska law also requires the helmet to consist of lining and padding that meets or exceeds federal regulations.

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Nevada Motorcycle Helmet Law

In Nevada, all motorcycle operators and passengers are required to wear helmets and protective glasses, goggles, or face shields when the riding.

If the bike is equipped with a windscreen, the driver and passenger are not required to wear glasses, goggles, or face shields.

Because helmet and eye protection standards can change, it's best to check with the Motor Vehicle Department to learn about current requirements before riding on a motorcycle in Nevada.

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New Hampshire Motorcycle Helmet Law

While New Hampshire hasn't had a helmet law since the National Highway System Designation Act passed in 1995, riders under the age of 18 are required to wear helmets.

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New Jersey Motorcycle Helmet Law

In New Jersey, all motorcycle operators and passengers must wear a securely-fitted helmet of a size proper for the wearer's head and of a type approved by New Jersey's Director of Motor Vehicles.

Helmets must be equipped with either a neck or chin strap and it must be 'reflectorized' on both sides. In addition, protective eyewear is required for all motorcycle operators.

The Motor Vehicle Director is authorized and empowered to adopt rules and regulations covering the types of approved helmets and their specifications and to establish and maintain a list of approved helmets that meet those specifications.

Because these rules are regulations are subject to change, it is advisable to check with the Motor Vehicle Director before riding on a motorcycle in New Jersey.

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New Mexico Motorcycle Helmet Law

Under New Mexico law, only those motorcycle operators and passengers under 18 are required to wear a helmet.

Those subject to the law must wear helmets that are securely fastened and that meet the standards specified by New Mexico's Director of Transportation.

Because these standards are subject to change, you should check with the Director before taking to the open road in New Mexico.

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New York Motorcycle Helmet Law

New York law requires all motorcycle drivers and riders to wear helmets that comply with federal law.

Police authorities of cities, towns, and villages may issue permits exempting members of organizations sponsoring or conducting parades or other public exhibitions from wearing helmets while they are participating.

In addition, New York requires all motorcycle operators to wear goggles or a face shield of a type approved by the Commissioner of the Department of Motor Vehicles. The Commissioner is authorized and empowered to adopt and amend regulations covering the types of permissible goggles and face shields and their specifications. To make sure your eye protection meets the Commissioner's standards, check with the Department of Motor Vehicles.

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North Carolina Motorcycle Helmet Law

In North Carolina, all motorcycle operators and passengers must wear helmets of the type approved by the United States Department of Transportation (DOT), with chin straps secured.

To make sure your helmet has been approved, check with the Commissioner before riding on a motorcycle in North Carolina.

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North Dakota Motorcycle Helmet Law

Under North Dakota law, all motorcycle operators and passengers under 18 must wear helmets that comply with standards adopted by the state's Department of Motor Vehicles. If an operator is under 18, his or her passenger must also wear a helmet, regardless of the passenger's age.

The only exception to North Dakota's helmet law is for those participating in authorized parades and those riding in an enclosed cab or golf carts. To check current compliance standards, contact the North Dakota Department of Motor Vehicles.

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Ohio Motorcycle Helmet Law

In Ohio, all motorcycle operators under 18 and those who hold a "novice license" must wear a helmet. Ohio issues "novice licenses" to motorcycle operators 18 or older who have never previously been licensed to operate a motorcycle in Ohio or any other state or another jurisdiction recognized by Ohio law.

Additionally, all motorcycle passengers under 18 must wear a helmet, as do passengers riding with operators holding a "novice" license, regardless of the passenger's age. All operators and passengers must wear safety glasses or other protective devices at all times.

Helmets, safety glasses, and other protective devices must conform with the regulations prescribed and adopted by Ohio's Director of Public Safety. Because these regulations are subject to change, it's best to check with the Director before taking a motorcycle out on Ohio roadways.

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Oklahoma Motorcycle Helmet Law

Oklahoma law requires only those motorcycle operators and passengers under 18 to wear helmets. Headgear must contain lining, padding, and chin straps, and it must not distort the view of the driver.

Operators of all ages, however, must wear goggles or a face shield of a material and design that protects the driver from foreign objects, unless the bike is equipped with a windshield of sufficient quality, size, and thickness to protect the operator from foreign objects.

Oklahoma's helmet laws are governed by the Commissioner of the Department of Public Safety. Because regulations are subject to change, it's best to check with the Commissioner before riding on a motorcycle, either as a driver or passenger, in Oklahoma.

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Oregon Motorcycle Helmet Law

In Oregon, all motorcycle drivers and passengers are required to wear helmets. Helmets must have stickers indicating that they meet standards established by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT).

The only exception is for those riding in an enclosed cab or motorcyclists operating or riding a vehicle designed to travel with three wheels in contact with the ground at speeds less than 15 mph.

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Pennsylvania Motorcycle Helmet Law

Pennsylvania repealed its mandatory helmet law in 2003.

Motorcycle operators 21 years of age and older, who have either been licensed to operate a motorcycle for at least two years or who have completed a motorcycle rider safety course approved by the Department of Motor Vehicles or the Motorcycle Safety Foundation, are not required to wear helmets.

Passengers who are 21 and older are permitted to ride on motorcycles without helmets, so long as the operator of the bike is not legally required to wear a helmet.

Riders with a motorcycle learner's permit are required to wear a helmet.

Those riding in a three-wheeled motorcycle equipped with an enclosed cab are not required to wear helmets.

All motorcycle operators and riders under 21, however, must wear helmets, regardless of how long the operator has been licensed or whether he or she has completed a safety course.

All motorcycle operators and riders are required to wear eye protection that is approved by the Department of Motor Vehicles.

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Rhode Island Motorcycle Helmet Law

Rhode Island law requires motorcycle operators under 21 to wear a helmet. Additionally, all new operators, regardless of age, must wear a helmet for one year after the date that their motorcycle operator's license is issued.

All operators, regardless of age, must wear eye protection at all times. All motorcycle passengers must wear helmets.

Helmets and eye protection must be approved by Rhode Island's Administrator of the Division of Motor Vehicles. To make sure your equipment is approved, check with the Administrator before taking a motorcycle out on Rhode Island roadways.

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South Carolina Motorcycle Helmet Law

In South Carolina, all motorcycle operators and passengers under 21 must wear a helmet approved by the Department of Highways and Public Transportation. The helmet must be equipped with either a neck or chin strap, and it must be 'reflectorized' on both sides.

The Department is authorized to adopt and amend regulations covering helmet types and specifications and to establish and maintain a list of approved helmets. If you're subject to the helmet law, it's best to check with the Department on current regulations before riding on a motorcycle in South Carolina.

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South Dakota Motorcycle Helmet Law

South Dakota law requires all motorcycle operators and passengers under 18 to wear a helmet that complies with federal regulations. In addition, operators of a motorcycle are required to wear eye protection unless their motorcycle has a windshield of sufficient height under the statutes. Also, riders in an enclosed cab do not need to wear a helmet or eye protection under South Dakota law.

No person is permitted to operate a motorcycle with a passenger under 18 unless the passenger is wearing a helmet.

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Tennessee Motorcycle Helmet Law

In Tennessee, the driver of a motorcycle and any riders must wear either a crash helmet meeting federal standards, or, if the driver or passenger is 21 or older, a helmet that meets federal motor vehicle safety standards, has ventilation airways that exceed one and one half inches in diameter, and has a label on it that says the helmet complies with the requirements of the American Society for Testing Materials, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, the Southern Impact Research Center, or the Snell Foundation.

The exceptions to Tennessee's mandatory helmet law are for those riding motorcycles with an enclosed cab, that have three wheels in contact with the ground, that weigh less than 1,500 pounds, and that have a capacity to maintain posted highway speed limits.

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Texas Motorcycle Helmet Law

Generally, Texas requires all riders and passengers to wear a helmet that meets the safety standard of the state's Department of Public Safety.

However, those 21 and over who successfully complete an approved motorcycle operator training and safety course or those covered by a health insurance plan providing at least $10,000 in medical benefits for injuries incurred while operating the motorcycle can drive the bike without wearing a helmet. A peace officer may not stop or detain a person who is the operator of, or a passenger on, a motorcycle for the sole purpose of determining whether the person has successfully completed the motorcycle operator training and safety course or is covered by a health insurance plan.

If you are subject to the mandatory helmet law, it's best to check with the Department of Public Safety to learn about current helmet safety standards before taking to the open road on a motorcycle.

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Utah Motorcycle Helmet Law

In Utah, motorcycle operators and riders under 18 must wear a helmet that complies with the standards established by the United States Department of Transportation (DOT). Closed-cab motorcycles are an exception to this law.

Because these rules are subject to change, those subject to the mandatory helmet law should check with the Commissioner before riding on a motorcycle in Utah.

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Vermont Motorcycle Helmet Law

Vermont law requires all motorcycle drivers and passengers to wear a helmet approved by the Commissioner of the Department of Motor Vehicles.

Although the Commissioner has the power to approve helmet types, the Vermont legislature did pass a law requiring all helmets to be equipped with either a neck to chin strap.

To make sure your helmet complies with the Commissioner's requirements, contact the Department of Motor Vehicles before riding on a motorcycle in Vermont.

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Virginia Motorcycle Helmet Law

In Virginia, all motorcycle operators and passengers must wear helmets that meet or exceed the specifications of the Snell Memorial Foundation (Snell), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), or the Federal Department of Transportation.

Virginia also requires all motorcycle operators to wear a face shield, safety glasses, or goggles, unless the bike is equipped with safety glass or a windshield approved by the Superintendent of the Department of Motor Vehicles or that meets or exceeds the standards and specifications of Snell, ANSI, or the federal Department of Transportation.

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Washington Motorcycle Helmet Law

Washington law requires all motorcycle operators and passengers to wear a helmet conforming to the rules adopted by the Washington State Patrol. The helmet must be equipped with either a neck or chin strap, which must be fastened securely when the motorcycle is in motion. There is an exception to this rule when the vehicle is an antique motor-driven cycle or automobile that is licensed as a motorcycle, or when the vehicle is equipped with seat belts and roll bars approved by the state patrol.

In addition, all operators must wear glasses, goggles, or a face shield of a type conforming to the rules adopted by the State Patrol, unless the motorcycle is equipped with a windshield.

The State Patrol is authorized and empowered to adopt and amend rules concerning standards and procedures for conformance of rules adopted for helmets, glasses, goggles, and face shields. Because these rules are subject to change, it's best to check with the State Patrol before riding on a motorcycle in Washington.

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West Virginia Motorcycle Helmet Law

In West Virginia, all motorcycle operators and passengers must wear a helmet that is securely fastened to the head by either a neck or chin strap. The helmet must be designed to deflect blows and resist penetration and spread impact forces. The law requires helmets to meet current performance specifications established by federal law, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard Z 90.1 or Snell Safety Standards (Snell) for Protective Headgear for Vehicle Users.

In addition, all motorcycle riders and passengers must wear safety, shatter-resistant eyeglasses, eye goggles, or a face shield that complies with ANSI Standard Z2.1. If a motorcycle is equipped with a windshield or a windscreen, it must comply with the performance specifications established by the Department of Transportation Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 205 and ANSI Safety Glazing Materials for Glazing Motor Vehicles on Land Highways, Standard Z26.1.

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Wisconsin Motorcycle Helmet Law

Wisconsin law requires all motorcycle operators under 18 or those operators holding an instructional permit to wear a helmet with a chin strap that is properly fastened. Passengers under 18 are also required to wear a helmet.

Regardless of age, all motorcycle operators must wear a protective face shield, glasses, or goggles, unless the bike is equipped with a windshield that rises to a minimum of 15 inches above the handlebars.

The laws do not apply to those participating in a parade sanctioned by a local municipality.

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Wyoming Motorcycle Helmet Law

In Wyoming, only those motorcycle drivers and passengers under 18 are required to wear helmets. Helmets must be securely fastened and comply with the standards established by the state's Superintendent of the Department of Transportation.

If you're under 18, it's best to check with the Department to make sure your helmet complies with current standards before riding on a motorcycle in Wyoming. Finally, there are two exceptions to this law.

If you're under 18 and ride in an enclosed cab, you are not required to wear a helmet. Also, motorcycle operators under 18 who are participating in an officially-authorized parade are exempted from the helmet law.

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Motorcycle Helmet Laws

Motorcycle helmet laws can be pretty confusing and could cost you an expensive ticket if you don't follow them. Because they change from state to state, it can be hard to keep track of what's legal and what's not.

For instance, not all Pennsylvania motorcyclists are required to wear a helmet. However, if you cross into New York State, not only are you and your passenger required to wear helmets, but full-face shields or goggles as well.

In many cases, a few miles may be the difference between an easy ride and an expensive helmet violation. Our law firm recommends always wearing a helmet. Not only will they keep you safe, but you won't have to worry about the laws changing from state to state. Click here for more motorcycle helmet safety information.

Federal Regulations

The federal government requires that all helmets meet the safety specifications set out by the Department of Transportation's Federal Motorcycle Vehicle Safety Standard 218.

State Helmet Laws

States are able to determine their own motorcycle helmet laws. So, it's important to know that when you ride through a state that requires a helmet, you must adhere to that law – regardless of where you're coming from or what your home state's law says.

Give Us a Call

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We can get you compensation for your injuries. Don't hesitate to contact us today. There's no obligation to use our services, and remember: there's never a fee unless we get money for you.

Need more information on state laws? Learn more about the laws where you live.

Note: Our attorneys are licensed to practice law in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Virginia. This information is not intended to solicit clients for matters outside of the states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Maryland, and Virginia, although if you are injured in an accident, we have relationships with other personal injury attorneys and lawyers throughout the United States.

Note: Our attorneys are licensed to practice law in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Virginia. This information is not intended to solicit clients for matters outside of the states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Maryland, and Virginia, although if you are injured in an accident, we have relationships with other personal injury attorneys and lawyers throughout the United States.
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