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Workplace Retaliation Lawyers in Pittsburgh, PA

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Workplace retaliation is when an employer takes negative action against an employee in response to the employee participating in a protected activity, such as filing a discrimination complaint or refusing to partake in an illegal activity. Retaliation in the workplace can make an employee’s work life uncomfortable—sometimes leading to job loss. Retaliation lawsuits can be difficult to prove and have many paperwork deadlines.

If you believe you are the victim of retaliation at work, you should consult an experienced employment lawyer about making a retaliation claim. Our law firm can help you meet the required deadlines and file necessary paperwork, including a claim with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Calls us today for a free consultation at 412-394-1000

What Are Some Examples of Retaliation?

Some examples of retaliation in the workplace include poor evaluations, demotion, pay reduction, disciplinary action, position reassignment, or employment termination. If an employer takes any of these actions in response to an employee’s discrimination or harassment complaint, they may be showing signs of retaliation at work. In this situation, the employee has certain rights and may qualify for a workplace retaliation settlement. Employers are also not allowed to retaliate against employees who request family or medical leave.

At Edgar Snyder & Associates, we understand the frustration that comes with navigating the legal process. We’ll be with you through every step of the retaliation claim, telling you when and where to sign, as well as explaining legal terms in a way that makes sense. It’s your livelihood on the line, and you deserve to be informed. Start by calling us today for a free consultation at 412-394-1000.

What Constitutes a Hostile Work Environment?

When a coworker or supervisor's actions or behavior impact your ability to do your job comfortably, it constitutes a hostile work environment. The actions or behavior must be discriminatory in nature and continue after the disruptive individual is warned. Hostile work environments develop when the organization neglects to investigate the action, or if an employer is aware of the behavior and does not interfere. A coworker who is rude or demonstrates inappropriate behavior might be distracting, but as long as he/she is not being discriminatory, his/her actions do not meet the criteria of a hostile workplace. On the other hand, a coworker who makes sexist jokes at work or continually makes remarks about your age or ethnicity after being warned is subject to creating a hostile work environment. If this problem occurs, you should ask the disruptive individual to stop. If the behavior continues, you should speak to a supervisor or someone in human resources to find a solution.

If the issue continues or if you face retaliation for filing a complaint, it's time to talk to a lawyer. The team at Edgar Snyder & Associates will fight hard to protect your rights, with no upfront cost to you. We're available for free consultations at 412-394-1000

How Do You Fight Retaliation at Work?

To fight retaliation at work, you must be able to prove a direct connection between your complaint and your employer’s retaliatory action. Additionally, you must be able to prove that the action you took is considered a protected activity, such as filing a discrimination claim or being involved in a harassment investigation. You are also protected from employer retaliation if your employer acts out because you neglected to participate in illegal or immoral activities.

If you believe you are subject to work retaliation, you should speak to your supervisor or someone in human resources to verify whether there was a legitimate reason for the retaliatory act. If you do not receive a legitimate reason, you should notify your employer that you believe that you are the victim of retaliation at work. After speaking with your employer, we suggest seeking legal advice from a qualified attorney.If you believe you are subject to employer retaliation, you should speak to your supervisor or someone in human resources to verify whether there was a legitimate reason for the retaliatory act. If you do not receive a legitimate reason, you should notify your employer that you feel victim of retaliation at work. After speaking with your employer, we suggest seeking legal advice from a qualified attorney.

Anything you tell us during your free consultation is confidential. And, If you hire us, we'll start building your case right away. We'll keep you informed the whole time, telling you what you can expect from your employer and keeping you updated about your retaliation lawsuit.

How Can You Prove Retaliation from Your Employer?

Your attorney will need to provide a direct connection between your complaint and your employer's retaliatory act, so we suggest that you do a few things:

  • Keep a detailed record of the retaliatory act as well as any potentially related events that follow. Detailed documentation of a workplace retaliation case can make all the difference in how successful a claim is.
  • Discuss the issue with someone in human resources before taking legal action. They may be able to provide a valid reason for the action. At the very least, your human resources department should have on record that the issue occurred, which can help when your attorney collects evidence for your retaliation lawsuit.

To ensure you have a strong retaliation case, you should be able to prove that the retaliation happened within a reasonable period after the complaint, and that the employer knew about the complaint when they retaliated. It is also helpful to prove that the employer had no reason to retaliate other than your complaint. For example, if you receive your first bad review in years after filing a complaint, this may help your case. Failing to prove these details may affect the legitimacy of your case.

Employers have legal experts on their side who start working right away to build a case against you. We believe you deserve a legal team who will do the same for you. Our employment law team is here to help you preserve your rights, with no upfront cost to you. Edgar Snyder & Associates is available 24/7 for free legal consultations at 412-394-1000. Remember, there's never a fee unless we get money for you.