Nevada Dog Law

Liability Statute

Nevada does not have a Dog Bite Statute. However, lack of a strict liability statute does not mean that liability may not attach under other types of liability, such as negligence, nuisance, or willful misconduct of various kinds.

Common Law Liability

In order to recover for dog-bite injuries, the plaintiff must prove that the dog owner was negligent and that the owner's negligence caused the plaintiff's injury.

Dangerous Dog Statute

The Meaning of a "Dangerous Dog"

A "dangerous dog" is:

  • a dog that, without provocation, on two separate occasions within an 18-month period, behaves menacingly, to a degree that would lead a reasonable person to defend himself against substantial bodily harm, whenever the dog is:
    • off the premises of its owner or keeper; or
    • not confined in a cage, pen or vehicle.

"Substantial bodily harm" means bodily injury which creates a substantial risk of death or which causes serious, permanent disfigurement or protracted loss or impairment of the function of any bodily organ or which causes prolonged physical pain.

The Meaning of a "Vicious Dog"

A dog is vicious if:

  • without provocation, it kills or inflicts substantial bodily harm upon a human being; or
  • after its owner or keeper was notified by a law enforcement agency that it is dangerous, it continues to behave menacingly to a degree that would lead a reasonable person to defend himself against substantial bodily harm, whenever the dog is:
    • off the premises of its owner or keeper; or
    • not confined in a cage, pen or vehicle.
  • it is used in the commission of a crime by its owner or keeper

A dog may not be found dangerous or vicious based solely on breed or because of a defensive act against a person attempting to commit a crime or who provoked the dog.

Liability of Owners with Vicious Dogs

  • It is illegal for a person to keep a vicious dog more than seven days after being notified that the dog is vicious.
  • If a person illegally owns a vicious dog and the dog attacks someone and causes substantial bodily harm, the owner or keeper is guilty of a felony that carries a term of one to four years in prison. The judge may also impose a fine up to $5,000 and order the dog destroyed.

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Note: Our attorneys are licensed to practice law in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Virginia. This information is not intended to solicit clients for matters outside of the states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Maryland, and Virginia, although if you are injured in an accident, we have relationships with other personal injury attorneys and lawyers throughout the United States.

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