Published on Jan 21, 2014 by Edgar Snyder

Johnson & Johnson Removes Controversial Chemicals from Popular Baby Shampoo

baby bath

New Formula Eliminates Formaldehyde and 1,4-Dioxane

Amid mounting pressure by consumers and environmental groups, Johnson & Johnson has removed two potentially harmful chemicals from its popular "No More Tears" baby shampoo and 100 additional baby products. The new "improved formula" now no longer contains formaldehyde and 1,4-dioxane.

In 2011, Johnson & Johnson vowed to remove both chemicals from its baby products by the end of 2013, and this month the company announced that they had met their goal. Although Johnson & Johnson insists that the original formula was safe, the company invested tens of millions of dollars to re-engineer the "No More Tears" baby shampoo, one of their most recognizable products.

While formaldehyde was not listed as an ingredient in the original product's formula, it is released over time by preservatives found in the baby shampoo. Formaldehyde is a known carcinogen which has been linked to cancer in animal studies.

This formula improvement marks the biggest effort yet by a major consumer products manufacturer to remove increasingly unpopular chemicals from personal care products. The reformulated products will begin replacing existing products on store shelves over the next several months.

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“The ‘No More Tears’ Shampoo, Now With No Formaldehyde.” Nytimes.com. January 17, 2014.
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