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Published on Apr 20, 2012 by Edgar Snyder

Accidental Death Rate for Children Drops

children accidents

Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death for children and adolescents between the ages of 1 and 19. In fact, a child dies from an unintentional injury almost every hour in the United States.

However, a new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that the death rate from unintentional injury among children and adolescents fell by almost 30 percent between 2000 and 2009. Additionally, the study revealed that deaths caused by car accidents, the leading cause of unintentional injury death among children, fell by more than 40 percent.

Unfortunately, the study also had some troubling findings:

  • During the study's 10-year period, accidental fatal poisonings from prescription drugs increased 91 percent among teens between the ages of 15 and 19.
  • Accidental suffocations among babies younger than one rose 54 percent.
  • The United States has the highest child injury death rate among all high-income counties.

While researchers do agree that progress has been made, they believe more safety measures can be put in place to reduce the predictable and preventable events that lead to accidental deaths. For example, if every state was able to decrease child injury death rates to fewer than 5 deaths per 100,000 children, like in Massachusetts and New Jersey, over 5,700 children's lives would be saved every year.

"Accidental death rate for children falls." CNN. April 16, 2012.
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